A New Alternative to Employee Lay-offs Can Help Staff Start-up/Small Businesses

In today’s economy it appears that every day more and more companies are laying off countless numbers of workers.  However, what you don’t hear about are the companies that are in dire need of superior talent, but typically can’t afford to hire a full-time person with the skills and experience they’re seeking.  From this dichotomy is born a new staffing business model currently being piloted in the United Kingdom.

This program is being launched by a not-for-profit organization called WorkWise UK, and the program, essentially an online swap shop, is called StaffShare.  The basic concept:  companies without current need for the employees they have – but yet not wanting to lose them permanently, offer them up for short and medium-term loan to companies needing the talent but not able to afford the full-time staff position.  Both firms provide their information on the website, the WorkWise system makes a potential match and the two parties work out the details of the exchange.  StaffShare takes a 7.5% commission for making the match.

The program was originally developed to benefit charitable organizations when it was conceptualized two and a half years ago.  However, after it’s launch 6 months ago  in the midst of the worst economic downturn in decades was so well received, the scope of the program was expanded.  Learn more about the details of the program HERE.

We at Strategic Growth Concepts believe this inventive business model has tremendous potential for success in the U.S. and will be watching the UK pilot to see how things progress.  We urge U.S. businesses to begin considering a similar program here, where major corporations that are now forced to consider layoffs can instead loan those employees to smaller or start-up businesses that can’t afford the high-skill, high-priced talent on a full-time basis, but can likely afford to take advantage of it for several weeks or months. 

What kind of impact do you think such a program could have on the development of new businesses/small businesses in the U.S.?  And since small businesses are typically responsible for the largest percentage of jobs and job growth in the U.S. economy, what type of impact could such a program have on the economic recovery if applied on a wide scale?  We think the results could have a substantial impact on economic recovery for the following reasons:

  • rather than experiencing layoffs, employees at companies considering down-sizing can instead be placed into temporary positions where they can maintain a regular income until once again needed at their permanent position
  • since employee layoffs would be decreased, less people will need to utilize state-sponsored unemployment programs and planned government health programs as well
  • less people needing to utilize unemployment programs insures that the Federal government will not have need to subsidize state programs and extend benefits; thereby making more money available for other economic growth-oriented programs (or to pay down the historic debt our country is now facing)
  • the employees placed in temporary positions will keep their skills fine-tuned, and will likely pick up additional skills and experience which will make them even more marketable going forward
  • companies that were considering layoffs can instead take advantage of the short-term cost-savings of having the employees temporarily removed from their payroll, but yet have the ability to bring them back when their company’s economic crisis has passed
  • small businesses will be able to achieve success faster due to the fact that they are able to take advantage of premier talent and expertise to help them achieve growth
  • more successful small businesses will create more jobs
  • more jobs will lead to faster economic recovery

I’m certain that economic naysayers will be able to poke holes in our assumptions about the potential benefits of such a program, but in my opinion, even if only one or two of those assumptions were to actually come to fruition, I believe the results would be positive.  What do you think?

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The author, Linda Daichendt, is Founder, CEO and Managing Consultant at Strategic Growth Concepts, a consulting and training firm specializing in start-up, small and mid-sized businesses. She is a recognized small business expert with 20+ years experience in providing Marketing, Operations, HR, and Strategic planning services to start-up, small and mid-sized businesses. Linda can be contacted at linda@strategicgrowthconcepts.com and the company website can be viewed at www.strategicgrowthconcepts.com.

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