More Ways to Avoid Layoffs

In our continuing research to find companies who have avoided layoffs and the ways in which they are doing so, we’ve come across some interesting examples and a variety of strategies.  However, one thing they all have in common – they all place a very high value on their employees and are willing to make extreme efforts to keep them.  Whether large or small, this is an excellent lesson for all businesses.

As a follow up to our article on a new alternative to layoffs being tested in the UK, below please find links to stories about more companies who have managed to save people by saving their jobs, thereby doing their part to keep the economy moving forward.

No layoffs – ever!

More companies without layoffs – ever!

Learned lessons from previous layoffs – now trim the fat, without trimming people.

Cutting labor costs, without cutting the labor

Cutting costs without layoffs

If your firm is seeking ways to avoid layoffs and can use some assistance, please feel free to contact us at Strategic Growth Concepts so we can help you get back on track and minimize the trauma to your firm.

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The author, Linda Daichendt, is Founder, CEO and Managing Consultant at Strategic Growth Concepts, a consulting and training firm specializing in start-up, small and mid-sized businesses. She is a recognized small business expert with 20+ years experience in providing Marketing, Operations, HR, and Strategic planning services to start-up, small and mid-sized businesses. Linda can be contacted at linda@strategicgrowthconcepts.com and the company website can be viewed at www.strategicgrowthconcepts.com.

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Younger Workers Getting the Axe; Older Workers Getting Jobs

 by John Zappe, Jul 28, 2009

CareerBuilder says unemployed older workers are having a tough time finding jobs. A survey released last week says only 28 percent of workers over 54 laid off in the past 12 months found new jobs compared to workers 25-34 who are quicker at finding work. In that age group, 71 percent found a job within 12 months.

As a result, says CareerBuilder, 63 percent of the 55 and up group have applied for lower-level jobs, including entry-level positions and even internships.

That’s probably not much of a surprise to recruiters; 37 percent of them told CareerBuilder they have received applications for entry-level jobs from retirees and workers over 50.

What may well come as a surprise is the rise in older workers and the impact the recession is having on their ranks.

Layoffs and job losses have hit the younger workers hardest. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the 18 months since January 1, 2008, the number of workers in the 25-54 age group has declined by 5.1 million. For workers over 54 though, there are 624,000 more working. In fact, there were gains in the number of older employed workers in every age group the BLS tracks except one — 55-59 year olds who saw a modest decline of 79,000 in the 18 months.

Before you point out that the sheer number of older Americans has been rising, which is certainly true, consider for a moment the participation rate. Based on a monthly survey conducted by the U.S. Census for the BLS, the participation rate is independent of population size. It describes the percent of various population groups in the labor force.

The data shows that for the last 10 years, more and more older Americans are working. Since 1999, the percent of working Americans 55-64 has grown by 10 percent, while the over 64 age group has jumped — and that’s an apt word — by almost 40 percent. Contrast those changes to the 25-34 year olds who have declined from 84.6 in 1999 to 82.9 percent for the six months ending in June.

In the 61 years for which the BLS has data, this many older Americans have never been employed. In the mid-50s the percentage began to rise until 1967 when, at the peak, an average of 62.3 percent Americans aged 55-64 worked. The percentage began to decline until it bottomed in 1986 at 54 percent of the age group working. There it remained, rising modestly until the recession of the 90s when it started its upward climb.

 Even more dramatic has been the number of those 65 and over reentering the workforce. For years, between 11 and 12 percent of retirement age Americans have worked. In 1998, on average, 11.9 percent of the 65 and over group worked. In June, it was 16.8 percent.

The explanation for the uptick in older Americans working is not too difficult to guess at: Longer life spans, better health, and access to health insurance whether private or through Medicare, the decline of the defined benefit pension coupled with the increase in the Social Security age, and, in the last two years, the recession, which has devastated many workers 401(k)s.

The implications, however, are harder to forsee, as is deciding if this is a structural change in the American labor force or a temporary economic blip. A BLS economist told me a colleague of his is researching these very questions.

Regardless of the cause of the return to work by older Americans, there’s no denying the graying of the workforce. For the first six months of this year workers 55 and over accounted for 21.8 percent of the labor force. That’s the highest percentage since 1971.

Meanwhile, the percentage of 25-34 year olds has taken a nose dive. From a high of 36.6 percent in 1986, the percentage has dropped 11.5 points to 25.1 percent for 2009. For the 25-54 year age group as a whole, there’s been a decline of almost eight points since 1993, when 86 percent of the workforce fell into that age group. For the first six months of 2009, 78.2 percent do.

Consider now the demographic factors we’ve detailed: an aging workforce, reentry into the workforce by workers who in years past would be retired, lower workforce participation by workers in the entry-level age group of 25-34, and, finally, the sheer reduction in employment by that age group caused by layoffs and other factors.

The implications of this are immense for employers and recruiters.

Among them is the increase they are seeing in mature workers seeking jobs. That 37 percent of recruiters who told CareerBuilder they’ve received applications from mature and retired workers for entry level jobs is, therefore, not that much of a surprise after all.

Even though the CareerBuilder survey says 65 percent of the employers report being willing to consider overqualified candidates, the reality is probably closer to the 44 percent of mature workers who say they’ve been told they are overqualified. Recruiters who reject overqualified mature workers may find it increasingly difficult to find the young workers who might otherwise take those jobs.

Should recovery from the recession prove to be as long as some economists are now fearing, retirements will continue to get pushed off and retirees with diminishing payouts from their 401(k)s and other savings will reenter the workforce at an accelerating pace.

Evidence of the former is in the CareerBuilder survey. One in five employers report being asked by employees to postpone retirement. Most of those employers (86 percent) said they would consider it.

If the demographics are any guide, 100 percent may come to wish they did.

Top 10 HR Mistakes Made by Businesses – Large & Small

  1. Failure to develop an effective corporate communication strategy; internal and external.
    • Establish specific communication policies
      • internal/external email
      • internet/intranet
      • social media
      • IM
      • media/public communication
      • corporate document sharing
    • Publicize internal communication; open access promotes honesty and trust between management and staff
      • staff meetings
      • town halls
      • newsletters
    • Handle confidential information appropriately
  2. Failure to link individual goals to company goals
    • Short-term and long-term objectives; personal and company
    • Developing action plans
      • corporate > division > department > individual
    • HR planning
      • staff selection & planning
      • training & development
  3. Not utilizing HR metrics to track activity and performance
    • Measure how activity is impacting the bottom line, not just the cost of the activity
    • Needs to objectively demonstrate benefits to the business
  4. Lack of employee motivation and retention strategies
    • What motivates employees?
      • recognition; feeling valued by the organization
      • sense of achievement
      • feeling they are an integral part of the organization
      • opportunity for increased responsibility and advancement
      • compensation package
    • Develop credible reward programs
    • Insure that compensation packages are competitive to the market
  5. Lack of strategic recruitment plan
    • Hire people that fit; effort, expectations, attitude, talent, skills, training, experience
    • HR needs to manage the recruitment process, not department heads or executives
  6. Lack of training
    • Empower front-line management with authority; train them to use it effectively for the organization’s benefit
    • Don’t allow lack of awareness to be an excuse for inappropriate actions
    • Insure managers have training regarding legal issues affecting the manager/employee relationship
    • Ensure there is a clear understanding of corporate values
  7. Not establishing employee performance guidelines
    • Establish a reward system based on performance
    • Insure timely attention to employee performance issues to prevent staff morale issues
  8. Failure to keep up-to-date on legal requirements related to HR
    • Establish a network of experts for guidance
    • Participate in continuing education programs
  9. Lack of documentation
    • Insure proper tracking, measuring, analysis, reporting and follow-up
    • Meet all legal requirements for payroll documentation
  10. Failure to maximize the effectiveness of the HR team
    • HR should be an integral part of the executive team
    • Be pro-active rather than re-active to avoid negative perception amongst staff
    • Allow the HR department to be the catalyst for change management initiatives

Let us help you avoid these mistakes; contact us via our website or email us at info@strategicgrowthconcepts.com for assistance with your HR strategies and structure.

Why Your Firm Needs an HR Professional

One of the questions I am often asked by small business owners is, “I only have one employee, why do I need to worry about human resources issues?”  While I can certainly understand the question – particularly if they don’t have a clear understanding of human resources, I find myself surprised that I get this same question from small businesses that are much larger than a one person firm.  In my career I have worked for (as an employee) and with (as a consultant) a significant number of small businesses that have had several hundred employees and still did not believe they had a need for a staff to perform HR functions (or even a person!).  As many times as I’ve experienced it, I’m still surprised.

However, given that experience, I thought it would be a good topic to broach as today’s blog post as I think it may launch some good discussion.  So here’s my statement of opinion, even if you have only one employee, you need to have an understanding of human resources issues.  And, if you have more than five employees, your understanding of HR and the type of HR program you put in place need to be substantially more comprehensive.  My justification follows.

Even if you are among the smallest of small business owners, you are still going to find yourself dealing with human resources related issues (even if you didn’t understand before today that those issues were human resources issues).  Some of the areas I’m thinking of would include:

·         Finding employees as you need them, and hiring the best ones that you possibly can

·         Once you’ve hired the best person, what programs and policies do you need to put in place to make sure that you can keep them

·         Training programs to help new employees learn company policies & procedures, as well as their new job responsibilities

·         Pay rates – are you paying them too much or not enough; are there any issues with a person being more than another person doing the same work though they have less experience; is there any chance they’ll train with you and then move to your competition because you don’t pay them enough?

·         Non-compete agreements.  While obviously drawn up by your legal advisor, it’s a human resource responsibility to insure that all new employees have signed them and that this information is tracked in their file.

·         Also, company key, equipment, credit cards, etc. – these need to be tracked and monitored  by employee to insure that your company is protected

·         Benefits – even if your only benefit is a paid holiday, there is still tracking that needs to be done; and if your company benefits are more extensive there is vendor identification, bidding, and management; as well as government reporting, tracking by employee and many other tasks associated with benefits.  Also, are your benefits meeting the legal minimum limits required in your state?  Are they competitive enough to help you recruit the employees you need?

·         Payroll – I know that most small businesses think this can be handled by the bookkeeper, however, there are a great many legalities involved at the state and local level with regard to employee payroll administration, time tracking, records management, etc.  If not handled properly, this issue alone can put your company in serious jeopardy!

·         How do you counsel an employee if they are having trouble with a co-worker

·         How do you counsel an employee if they are having performance issues

·         Terminating employees who are not performing or who have broken a company policy (and by the way, development of those policies is another HR issue)

·         Annual performance evaluations that need to be done on every employee

·         Worker’s compensation – are you paying the correct rate?  How do you handle it if someone gets injured at your place of employment or on a jobsite?  Do you know what the procedures are and how it will affect your company?

·         Do you have an employee handbook so that everyone knows the rules and understands them clearly?  If not, this leaves your company vulnerable if an ex-employee decides he or she has cause to sue you.

·         Do you have job descriptions for every position – and performance standards?

Convinced yet?  This is by no means a comprehensive list, but I believe it will give you some perspective on why the average small business owner shouldn’t be trying to handle human resource issues without the assistance of professionally-trained HR staff member or similar resource.

Remember, the right staff can help you build your company to a great deal of success – or they can contribute significantly to its downfall.  As a small business owner, you have enough on your plate with the many hats you are already wearing.  Therefore, it’s not in your firm’s best interest for you to manage the details of human resources legalities and such for which you have no training.  Just as you need a professional skill level in an attorney and an accountant, I would recommend if you still believe that your firm is too small to have a full-time HR need, then you should hire at minimum a part-time staff member or outsource the work to a consulting firm who specializes in such issues.  Either option will give you the benefit of the expertise you need while still keeping your costs as low as possible.

If this article has caused you to re-think the way you are handling your firm’s human resources issues, please feel free to contact us to schedule a free consultation with one of our HR associates to discuss your areas of concern and how we may be able to assist you so you can go back to doing what you do best – increasing the profitability of your company!

3 Critical Steps to Improving Your Small Business HR

By Kris Bovay, Manta Online

If people are your most important resource, then you need to understand the role of human resources in your small business. Many small business owners believe that because they have only a few employees they do not need to focus on human resources issues. The reality is that when you are a small business owner, you need to focus more attention and support to your human resources because, effectively, they can make or break your business.

Even from a mathematical perspective this is true. If a small business has only 4 employees, each of those employees has at least a 20% impact on the business (the small business owner is counted in this impact assessment). If a business has 19 employees, each of those employees has a 5% impact on the business; and so on. Therefore the impact of a bad hiring decision or an under-performing employee is significant to small businesses.

Every business employs resources to get work done; typically the resources are a mix of people and equipment. Equipment resources are typically measured for value (that is, cost and return on investment or payback on investment). Human resources are often not valued similarly but if they were, business owners would pay a lot more attention to making sure they hired the right people, trained them well and measured their performance effectiveness regularly.

Click HERE to read what you can do to make your business’ HR efforts more effective.